evilsupplyco:

One of the most difficult and intriguing issues facing time travelers is the concept of aging. For the temporally static (a non-time traveler), it’s a simple matter of Date A (birth) proceeded by Dates B+ (life) until Date C (death), and sometimes Date D (undeath). For the temporally mobile (time travelers), the issue becomes a bit trickier.
The earliest form of time travel duration testing came with the counting of heartbeats. This had obvious issues (different hearts beat at different times, and it is never at a consistent flow), and couldn’t factor how to count the decay of non-organic (or non-living) material. The Hays Axiom will be used until 2980 to compensate.
Evil Supply Co. will partner with Dr. Meghan Dennis in 2982 to release the Hays Paradox, the name of both the formula (which re-calibrated the speed of light when it was first written, hence 2981’s lack of existence) and a small, handheld device that accurately describes the true age of any object (living, non-organic, and formerly organic/currently mystical).
The Hays Paradox will be used for many generations. We haven’t been contacted by our future selves telling us of any replacements, so it is quite possible it will be used until the end of time travel itself. Considering the profit margin of each Hays Paradox, this is great news for our shareholders.
An editorial note on the lack of existence of 2981: This is based on the time’s forward, linear progression as marked by the (then) modern calendars. Any and all events (including the births of your descendants) will be unaffected, much in the way Leap Year is recalculated in 2141.
This past was sponsored by Evil Supply Co.’s "Paradoxes I have caused while traveling through time" pocket notebooks, available here.

evilsupplyco:

One of the most difficult and intriguing issues facing time travelers is the concept of aging. For the temporally static (a non-time traveler), it’s a simple matter of Date A (birth) proceeded by Dates B+ (life) until Date C (death), and sometimes Date D (undeath). For the temporally mobile (time travelers), the issue becomes a bit trickier.

The earliest form of time travel duration testing came with the counting of heartbeats. This had obvious issues (different hearts beat at different times, and it is never at a consistent flow), and couldn’t factor how to count the decay of non-organic (or non-living) material. The Hays Axiom will be used until 2980 to compensate.

Evil Supply Co. will partner with Dr. Meghan Dennis in 2982 to release the Hays Paradox, the name of both the formula (which re-calibrated the speed of light when it was first written, hence 2981’s lack of existence) and a small, handheld device that accurately describes the true age of any object (living, non-organic, and formerly organic/currently mystical).

The Hays Paradox will be used for many generations. We haven’t been contacted by our future selves telling us of any replacements, so it is quite possible it will be used until the end of time travel itself. Considering the profit margin of each Hays Paradox, this is great news for our shareholders.

An editorial note on the lack of existence of 2981: This is based on the time’s forward, linear progression as marked by the (then) modern calendars. Any and all events (including the births of your descendants) will be unaffected, much in the way Leap Year is recalculated in 2141.

This past was sponsored by Evil Supply Co.’s "Paradoxes I have caused while traveling through time" pocket notebooks, available here.

147 notes

asapscience:

The invitation to Stephen Hawking’s time travel party, which was held with the hope that someone from the future would make the effort to come back in to time to attend it.
On 28 June 2009, Hawking held the party, releasing the invitations after the party was held. Unfortunately, no time travelers showed up. “”I gave a party for time-travellers, but I didn’t send out the invitations until after the party. I sat there a long time, but no one came.”
Poster by Peter Dean

asapscience:

The invitation to Stephen Hawking’s time travel party, which was held with the hope that someone from the future would make the effort to come back in to time to attend it.

On 28 June 2009, Hawking held the party, releasing the invitations after the party was held. Unfortunately, no time travelers showed up. “”I gave a party for time-travellers, but I didn’t send out the invitations until after the party. I sat there a long time, but no one came.”


Poster by Peter Dean

327 notes

asapscience:

The invitation to Stephen Hawking’s time travel party, which was held with the hope that someone from the future would make the effort to come back in to time to attend it.
On 28 June 2009, Hawking held the party, releasing the invitations after the party was held. Unfortunately, no time travelers showed up. “”I gave a party for time-travellers, but I didn’t send out the invitations until after the party. I sat there a long time, but no one came.”
Poster by Peter Dean

asapscience:

The invitation to Stephen Hawking’s time travel party, which was held with the hope that someone from the future would make the effort to come back in to time to attend it.

On 28 June 2009, Hawking held the party, releasing the invitations after the party was held. Unfortunately, no time travelers showed up. “”I gave a party for time-travellers, but I didn’t send out the invitations until after the party. I sat there a long time, but no one came.”


Poster by Peter Dean

327 notes

miguelmarquezoutside:

Example of a reconverted pay phone currently available in a few Sydney locations. 

2,582 notes

collegehumor:

What was going ON in that decade? Wouldn’t it be awesome if literally any of us could go back to 1982 and just instantly be more attractive than everyone and become revered movie stars / models / successful post-punk new-wave bands? And we’d get to rub elbows / have sex with the other most attractive people in the decade, namely Prince, Kelly LeBrock in the movie Weird Science, and that’s it! Just those two.

Finish reading 10 Dumb Things I’d Actually Use Time Travel For

734 notes

aetv:

Henry probably won’t be speaking with Deena again.

aetv:

Henry probably won’t be speaking with Deena again.

37 notes


Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (2014)

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (2014)

1,752 notes

gregorygalloway:

Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005)

gregorygalloway:

Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005)

39 notes

..tender young blondes with lobotomy eyes..
Hunter S.Thompson
~Hell’s Angels (via bethanie-the-wookie)

3 notes

..tender young blondes with lobotomy eyes..
Hunter S.Thompson
~Hell’s Angels (via bethanie-the-wookie)

3 notes

vizual-statistix:

Have you ever wondered how fast you are spinning around Earth’s rotational axis?  Probably not, but now you can find out anyway!  This graph shows the tangential speed of a point on Earth’s surface for a given latitude due to Earth’s rotational motion – it does not include speed due to our revolution around the sun! Tangential (linear) speed is the magnitude of the velocity vector, which points tangent to Earth’s surface in the same plane as the circle of latitude.
I’ve plotted the dependent variable (speed) on the x-axis; though this is unconventional, it allows the map in the background to be placed in the traditional north-pointing-up orientation.  So if you don’t know the latitude of your location, you can pick it out on the map and then trace a horizontal line to where it intersects with the curve. To the scientists and non-US readers, sorry that the speed axis is in mph; I converted from km/h because most of the people who read this are from the US.
Those who remember their trigonometry will notice that this graph is nothing more than a slight variation on the cosine function – because I have switched the axes, it could be thought of as cosine reflected over y=x, or arccos if it had no range restrictions and could plot below the x-axis.
Though this is an approximation, in an effort to be as accurate as possible, I used the length of a sidereal day (23 hrs, 56 min, 4 sec), which is a full 360° rotation of Earth. Because Earth is an oblate spheroid rather than a sphere, I varied the radius as a function of latitude when calculating the tangential speed. The polar radius is 3950 miles and the equatorial radius is 3963 miles; I approximated the radius at other latitudes via a linear interpolation. This has no visible effect on the curve, though. Using the average radius of the earth (3959 miles) as a constant changes the global tangential speeds by <1 mph. Topography of the Earth is equally unimportant for this level of accuracy because the difference between a mountain peak and the bottom of the ocean is trivial compared to the radius of the Earth. If, hypothetically, Mt. Everest’s peak (5.5 miles above datum) and the deepest part of the Mariana Trench (6.8 miles below datum) were both located along the equator, the difference in tangential speed caused by the 12.3 mile elevation difference would only be about 3 mph, or less than a third of a percent of the equator’s 1040 mph tangential speed.

vizual-statistix:

Have you ever wondered how fast you are spinning around Earth’s rotational axis?  Probably not, but now you can find out anyway!  This graph shows the tangential speed of a point on Earth’s surface for a given latitude due to Earth’s rotational motion – it does not include speed due to our revolution around the sun! Tangential (linear) speed is the magnitude of the velocity vector, which points tangent to Earth’s surface in the same plane as the circle of latitude.

I’ve plotted the dependent variable (speed) on the x-axis; though this is unconventional, it allows the map in the background to be placed in the traditional north-pointing-up orientation.  So if you don’t know the latitude of your location, you can pick it out on the map and then trace a horizontal line to where it intersects with the curve. To the scientists and non-US readers, sorry that the speed axis is in mph; I converted from km/h because most of the people who read this are from the US.

Those who remember their trigonometry will notice that this graph is nothing more than a slight variation on the cosine function – because I have switched the axes, it could be thought of as cosine reflected over y=x, or arccos if it had no range restrictions and could plot below the x-axis.

Though this is an approximation, in an effort to be as accurate as possible, I used the length of a sidereal day (23 hrs, 56 min, 4 sec), which is a full 360° rotation of Earth. Because Earth is an oblate spheroid rather than a sphere, I varied the radius as a function of latitude when calculating the tangential speed. The polar radius is 3950 miles and the equatorial radius is 3963 miles; I approximated the radius at other latitudes via a linear interpolation. This has no visible effect on the curve, though. Using the average radius of the earth (3959 miles) as a constant changes the global tangential speeds by <1 mph. Topography of the Earth is equally unimportant for this level of accuracy because the difference between a mountain peak and the bottom of the ocean is trivial compared to the radius of the Earth. If, hypothetically, Mt. Everest’s peak (5.5 miles above datum) and the deepest part of the Mariana Trench (6.8 miles below datum) were both located along the equator, the difference in tangential speed caused by the 12.3 mile elevation difference would only be about 3 mph, or less than a third of a percent of the equator’s 1040 mph tangential speed.

569 notes